Exploring the Best of Kakadu National Park: Waterfalls, Wildlife, and Aboriginal Culture

Northern Territory Travel Guide - Kakadu National Park

Welcome to the ultimate bucket list for Kakadu National Park!

If you’re planning a trip to the Northern Territory of Australia, there’s one place you absolutely cannot miss: Kakadu Park.

Spanning over 20,000 square kilometers, Kakadu is a diverse and stunning landscape that is home to countless natural wonders, cultural treasures, and unique experiences.

From ancient rock art to rugged hiking trails, incredible wildlife encounters, and breathtaking views, there is no shortage of things to see and do in this incredible part of the world. And that’s why we’ve put together the ultimate bucket list for Kakadu National Park – a comprehensive guide to the Kakadu best must-see attractions that you won’t want to miss.

Hema - Northern Territory

Hema’s HX-2 Navigator

Explore Australia with Hema’s HX-2 Navigator, the ultimate GPS system for on and off-road navigation.

Hema HX-2 Navigator

In this article, we’ll take you through the natural wonders, hiking trails, rock art sites, wildlife experiences, river cruises, Indigenous culture, scenic views, and family-friendly activities that make Kakadu National Park such a special place to visit.

We will also answer most common questions you may have. So buckle up and get ready to start planning your dream trip to one of Australia’s most breathtaking destination!

Arnhem Land

Here are some interesting Kakadu National Park facts:

  • Kakadu is Australia’s largest national park, covering an area of almost 20,000 square kilometers.
  • The park is home to over 10,000 crocodiles, both freshwater and saltwater, and visitors are advised to be cautious when near the waterways.
  • The rock art in Kakadu is thought to be some of the oldest and most impressive in the world, with some examples dating back over 20,000 years.
  • The park is home to a diverse range of flora and fauna, including over 280 species of birds, 117 species of reptiles, 25 species of mammals, and many species of fish and insects.
  • The park has been inhabited by Aboriginal people for over 65,000 years, and there are numerous sites throughout the park that are of cultural and spiritual significance to the local Indigenous communities.
  • In 1981, the park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List, making it one of only a handful of places in the world that are recognized for both their natural and cultural significance.
  • What Kakadu means? The term “Kakadu” is believed to be a mispronunciation of the word “Gagudju”, which is the name of one of the local Indigenous groups that have lived in the area for tens of thousands of years.
  • The park is home to a number of unique geological formations, including the towering sandstone cliffs of the Arnhem Land escarpment, which rise to over 300 meters in some places.
  • In the wet season, many of the roads in the park become impassable due to flooding, and visitors are advised to check road conditions and plan their trip carefully.
  • Kakadu has been the setting for a number of films, including “Crocodile Dundee” and “Australia”, which was directed by Baz Luhrmann and starred Nicole Kidman and Hugh Jackman.
View from Gunlom Falls

What is the history of Kakadu National Park?

The history of Kakadu National Park dates back over 65,000 years, with the land being home to the Bininj/Mungguy people, the traditional custodians of the area.

The park was first established in 1979 as a way of protecting the natural and cultural resources of the region. Kakadu has been recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1981, due to its unique natural and cultural values.

The area has also been impacted by European settlement, with the establishment of the gold rush and pastoral industry in the 1800s. In the 1950s, mining and exploration of uranium began in the area, leading to a long and ongoing struggle between the Bininj/Mungguy people and mining companies over the use of their land.

Today, the park is jointly managed by the traditional owners and the Australian government, with a strong focus on preserving and celebrating the unique cultural and natural heritage of the area.

Where is Kakadu National Park located?

Kakadu National Park is a vast, protected wilderness area located in the Northern Territory of Australia. The park is situated approximately 170 kilometres east of Darwin, the capital city of the Northern Territory, and covers an area of almost 20,000 square kilometres.

Koolpin Gorge from the top

What is the best time to visit Kakadu National Park?

The best time to visit Kakadu National Park is during the dry season, which runs from May to October. During this time, the weather is pleasant with lower humidity and fewer mosquitoes, making it easier to explore the park’s attractions.

The cooler and drier months from June to August are particularly popular with visitors, as this is the peak tourist season. In addition to comfortable weather, the dry season also offers better visibility for wildlife watching and exploring the park’s waterways.

It’s important to note that some areas of the park may be inaccessible during the wet season from November to April due to flooding, and the increased humidity and rainfall can make hiking and outdoor activities challenging.

What is the weather like in Kakadu National Park?

The weather in Kakadu National Park varies throughout the year. The park is located in the tropical north of Australia, so it has a monsoonal climate, which means it has a distinct wet and dry season.

The dry season, which runs from May to October, is characterized by warm, sunny days and cool nights. The wet season, which runs from November to April, is characterized by high humidity, monsoonal rain, and thunderstorms.

The wet season is also known for the park’s dramatic waterfalls and lush vegetation. It’s important to check the weather forecast and road conditions before visiting the park, especially during the wet season, as some roads may be closed due to flooding.

Brolga

How long does it take to explore Kakadu National Park?

To see the main attractions, we recommend a minimum of 3-4 days. However, to fully appreciate the park’s natural beauty and cultural significance, stay longer than minimum.

Many visitors spend 7-10 days exploring the park and its surrounding areas. Keep in mind that the park is quite large and travel times between attractions can be significant, so plan your itinerary accordingly.

What is the best way to get to Kakadu National Park?

To get to Kakadu National Park, visitors can drive from Darwin along the Arnhem Highway, which is approximately a 3-hour drive. Alternatively, visitors can take a scenic flight from Darwin to Jabiru, which takes around 45 minutes. Another option is to join a guided tour or hire a car in Darwin to explore the park.

If you are travelling by car from the south to Kakadu National Park, the most common route is to take the Stuart Highway from Alice Springs and head north to Katherine. From Katherine, you can take the Arnhem Highway east to the park.

The drive from Katherine to the park entrance takes about 3 hours, and the distance is approximately 300 kilometres. Along the way, you will see some stunning landscapes, including escarpments, floodplains, and bushland.

It is important to note that during the wet season, some roads in the park may be closed, so it is best to check the road conditions before embarking on the journey.

On the way to Gunlom Falls


Can I take my own vehicle to Kakadu National Park?

Yes, you can take your own vehicle to Kakadu National Park. The park has a network of sealed and unsealed roads that are accessible by 2WD and 4WD vehicles. There are also several designated campgrounds and picnic areas that can be accessed by vehicles.

However, it is important to note that some areas of the park are only accessible by 4WD vehicles, and it is recommended to check with park rangers or the park’s website for road conditions and closures before driving in the park. Additionally, there are some areas of the park where permits are required to access, and fees may apply.

Some areas of Kakadu where 4WD and/or permit is required include:

  • Jim Jim Falls and Twin Falls: These iconic waterfalls can only be reached via a 4WD track that is often closed during the wet season (November to April). Tween falls tracks have a deep water crossing and snorkel is essential.
  • Koolpin Gorge: This secluded gorge is only accessible by 4WD vehicles, and a permit is required to enter the area. Book it well ahead, it took us two attempts to be successful..
  • Maguk (Barramundi Gorge): This stunning waterfall and swimming hole is located at the end of a 4WD track, which can be rough and narrow in some sections.
  • Graveside Gorge: This remote gorge is located in the southern part of the park and can only be reached via a challenging 4WD track.

Is it possible to do a self-guided tour of Kakadu National Park?

Mitchell Falls Campground

Yes, the park is well signposted and there are numerous maps and guides available to help visitors navigate the park. However, it is important to note that some areas of the park can be challenging to access and it is recommended that visitors have a good level of fitness and experience in remote travel before attempting a self-guided tour.

If you choose to do a self-guided tour, be sure to take plenty of water, food, and fuel as supplies can be limited in some areas of the park.

Is it possible to visit Kakadu National Park as a day trip from Darwin?

Yes, it is possible to visit Kakadu National Park as a day trip from Darwin, although it is a long day and you may not have time to see all of the major attractions. The park is about a 2-3 hour drive from Darwin, depending on which part of the park you want to visit, so it is recommended to leave early in the morning to maximize your time there.

There are several tour operators in Darwin that offer day trips to Kakadu, which can include transportation, guided tours, and admission to the park. Alternatively, you can also rent a car and drive yourself, but be sure to check the park’s opening hours and plan your route accordingly.


How much does it cost to visit Kakadu National Park?

The cost of visiting Kakadu National Park can vary depending on a few factors, such as the length of your visit, the activities you plan to do, and whether you’re an Australian resident or an international visitor.

As of 2023, the standard entry fee for an adult is AUD $40 for a 14-day pass, while a yearly pass costs AUD $100.

Children under 16 years of age and Australian seniors may be eligible for free or discounted entry.

Some activities within the park, such as scenic flights or boat tours, may also have additional costs. It’s best to check the official Kakadu National Park website or speak with a local tour operator for the most up-to-date information on entry fees and activity costs.

Saltwater crocodiles silently wait for their prey

What are the safety considerations when visiting Kakadu NP?

Visiting Kakadu National Park can be an exciting and memorable experience, but it’s important to be aware of potential safety hazards. Some of the safety considerations to keep in mind when visiting Kakadu National Park include:

  • Wildlife encounters: Kakadu is home to a range of wildlife, including crocodiles, snakes, and other potentially dangerous animals. Be sure to follow all signs and guidelines to avoid wildlife encounters and stay safe.
  • Extreme weather: The weather in Kakadu can be extreme, with temperatures often reaching over 40 degrees Celsius and heavy rain and flooding during the wet season. Be sure to check weather forecasts and plan your activities accordingly.
  • Remote locations: Many of the attractions in Kakadu are located in remote areas, so be sure to bring appropriate supplies and equipment, including plenty of water, food, and first aid supplies.
  • Swimming safety: Swimming in waterholes and billabongs in Kakadu can be dangerous, as some areas are home to crocodiles. Only swim in designated swimming areas, and be sure to follow all safety guidelines and signage.
  • Road safety: Kakadu’s roads can be narrow and winding, with limited visibility. Be sure to drive with caution and follow all road rules and signage.
  • Be prepared for the weather: Kakadu National Park can be hot and humid, especially during the wet season. Bring appropriate clothing, sun protection, and plenty of water to stay hydrated.
Australian Buffalo we spotted on the way to Koolpin Gorge
  • Watch out for wildlife: While the wildlife in Kakadu National Park is a highlight of any visit, it’s important to keep a safe distance and not approach or feed any animals. Crocodiles are a particular danger in the park’s waterways.
  • Respect the Indigenous culture and sacred sites: Many areas of Kakadu National Park hold significant cultural and spiritual meaning to the local Indigenous communities. Visitors should follow park guidelines and avoid disturbing or damaging these sites.
  • Stick to designated trails and roads: Venturing off-trail can be dangerous and harmful to the environment. Stick to designated trails and roads to avoid getting lost or damaging fragile ecosystems.
  • Be prepared for remote travel: Parts of Kakadu National Park can be remote and have limited or no mobile phone coverage. Ensure your vehicle is in good condition, bring a map or GPS, and let someone know your travel plans before setting out.

Are there any crocodiles in Kakadu National Park?

Yes, there are both saltwater and freshwater crocodiles in Kakadu National Park. It is important to be aware of the potential presence of crocodiles and to follow all park regulations and safety guidelines to avoid any dangerous encounters with them.

It is important to always obey warning signs, stay away from the water’s edge, and never feed or provoke the crocodiles. There have been several incidents involving saltwater crocodiles in Kakadu National Park.

One of the most well-known incidents occurred in 1987 when a German tourist was taken by a crocodile while swimming in the East Alligator River.

Since then, there have been several other attacks and near-misses, including incidents where crocodiles have capsized boats or attacked people who were fishing or swimming in waterways.

These incidents serve as a reminder that visitors to Kakadu National Park need to be aware of the dangers posed by saltwater crocodiles and should take appropriate safety precautions when in or near the water.

Read more about saltwater crocodiles and incidents that happened around Australia.

Saltwater Crocodile

What should I do if I encounter a snake or other dangerous wildlife in Kakadu?

If you encounter a snake or other dangerous wildlife in Kakadu National Park, the first thing to do is to remain calm and keep a safe distance.

Do not approach or attempt to handle the animal. If you are on a guided tour, follow the instructions of your guide. If you are hiking or exploring on your own, be aware of your surroundings and stay on marked trails.

Avoid tall grass, bushes, and other areas where snakes and other wildlife may hide. If you see a snake, give it plenty of space and back away slowly. If you are bitten by a snake or other wildlife, seek immediate medical attention. We also always carry a snake bite bandage with indicators.

How to start a blog


What should I bring when visiting Kakadu National Park?

When visiting Kakadu National Park, it’s important to pack appropriately to ensure a safe and comfortable trip. Here are some essential items to bring:

  • Sun protection: The sun in Kakadu National Park can be intense, so bring sunscreen, a hat, and sunglasses to protect yourself.
  • Insect repellent: Mosquitoes and other insects can be abundant in the park, especially during the wet season, so bring insect repellent to avoid bites.
  • Sturdy walking shoes: Many of the attractions in the park require walking or hiking, so bring comfortable sturdy walking shoes.
  • Water bottle: It’s important to stay hydrated in the hot, dry climate of the park, so bring a refillable water bottle.
  • First aid kit: A basic first aid kit can be useful for treating minor injuries or illnesses.
  • Camera: The park is home to incredible natural beauty, so bring a camera to capture the stunning landscapes and wildlife.
  • Binoculars: To get a closer look at wildlife, bring binoculars for a better view.
  • Appropriate clothing: Dress for the climate, with light, breathable clothing. Don’t forget to bring a rain jacket during the wet season.
  • Cash and cards: While there are some ATMs and shops in the park, it’s a good idea to bring cash and cards for any unexpected expenses.
  • Maps and guidebooks: To plan your itinerary and learn more about the park, bring maps and guidebooks to help you navigate and understand the area.
  • Flashlight: There are several guided night tours and activities in the park, such as wildlife spotting and stargazing. A flashlight can come in handy during these activities.


Where can I stay when visiting Kakadu National Park?

There are several accommodation options available when visiting Kakadu National Park. These include campgrounds, caravan parks, and lodges. Some of the popular places to stay in the park include Cooinda Lodge, Mercure Kakadu Crocodile Hotel, and Kakadu Lodge.

In addition, there are several campgrounds and caravan parks located throughout the park. It’s important to note that accommodations in the park can be limited and often book up quickly, especially during the peak tourist season. Therefore, it’s recommended to make reservations in advance to ensure availability.

Merl Campground

Can I camp in Kakadu National Park?

Yes, you can camp in Kakadu National Park, and there are several campgrounds available for visitors. Some campgrounds are managed by the park, while others are run by private operators.

The park offers a range of camping options to suit different budgets and preferences, from basic bush camping to more developed campgrounds with amenities like showers, toilets, and BBQ facilities.

It’s important to note that some campgrounds may be closed during the wet season (November to April) due to flooding or other safety concerns. It’s also essential to book ahead during the peak season (May to September) to secure a spot, as campgrounds can get busy.

Here is a list of known campgrounds in Kakadu National Park:

  • Cooinda Campground – located near Yellow Water Billabong and offers powered and unpowered sites, as well as cabins.
  • Jabiru Town Campground – located near the town of Jabiru and offers powered and unpowered sites, as well as cabins.
  • Merl Campground – located near the East Alligator River and offers unpowered sites..
  • Red Lily Billabong Campground – located near the Red Lily Billabong and offers unpowered sites.
  • Kambolgie Campground – located in the southern part of the park and offers unpowered sites.
  • Muirella Park Campground: located in the heart of Kakadu, this campground has unpowered campsites and basic facilities, such as toilets and cold showers.
  • Mardugal Campground: situated near the entrance of the park, this campground has both powered and unpowered sites, as well as hot showers, toilets, and a communal kitchen.
  • Jim Jim Falls Campground: located near the iconic Jim Jim Falls, this campground has unpowered sites, basic facilities, and access to a swimming hole.
  • Gunlom Campground: situated near the stunning Gunlom Falls, this campground has unpowered campsites, picnic tables, and toilets.
  • Jarrangbarnmi (Koolpin Gorge) Campground: located in the remote southern section of Kakadu, this campground is only accessible by four-wheel drive and requires a permit. It has basic facilities and provides access to the beautiful Koolpin Gorge.

Kakadu National Park does not have any caravan parks within its boundaries, but there are several options for caravan parks in nearby towns. Some of the caravan parks near Kakadu National Park include:

  • Aurora Kakadu Caravan Park – located in the town of Jabiru, just outside the park’s entrance, this caravan park offers powered and unpowered sites, as well as cabins and facilities such as a swimming pool, BBQ area, and laundry.
  • Kakadu Lodge and Caravan Park – located in the town of Jabiru, this caravan park offers powered and unpowered sites, as well as cabins, a swimming pool, a BBQ area, and laundry.
  • Mary River Wilderness Retreat and Caravan Park – located approximately 80 km from Kakadu National Park, this caravan park offers powered and unpowered sites, as well as cabins and facilities such as a swimming pool, restaurant, and laundry.
  • Cooinda Lodge and Caravan Park – located within Kakadu National Park, this caravan park offers powered and unpowered sites, as well as cabins, a swimming pool, a restaurant, and laundry.
Roof Tent

What are the camping facilities like in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park has a range of camping facilities available for visitors, including both basic and more developed campgrounds. Some of the basic campgrounds have no facilities, while others have pit toilets, picnic tables, and fire pits. Better campgrounds offer additional amenities such as showers, cooking facilities, and drinking water.

The campgrounds in Kakadu National Park are managed by Parks Australia, and fees are charged for camping. The cost of camping varies depending on the type of campground and the facilities provided. Camping provided by Parks Australia operates on a first-come-first-serve basis.

Some campgrounds in Kakadu Park include:

  • Merl Campground: Located in the southern part of the park, this campground has 30 sites and offers picnic tables, fire pits, and pit toilets. It is suitable for tents and camper trailers, but not caravans.
  • Anbinik Kakadu Resort: This campground is located in Jabiru, and offers powered and unpowered sites, as well as cabins and villas. Amenities include a swimming pool, laundry facilities, and a restaurant.
  • Cooinda Campground: This is a larger campground with 200 sites, located near Yellow Water Billabong. Facilities include showers, toilets, a swimming pool, a restaurant, and a convenience store.
  • Mardugal Campground: Located near Ubirr, this campground has 25 sites and offers picnic tables, fire pits, and pit toilets. It is suitable for tents and camper trailers, but not caravans.


What are the best camping sites for RVs and caravans in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park has several camping sites for RVs and caravans that offer various amenities and facilities. We created our subjective list of some of the best camping sites for RVs and caravans in Kakadu National Park:

  • Cooinda Lodge: Cooinda Lodge has a camping site with powered and unpowered sites for RVs and caravans. It is located near Yellow Water Billabong and offers facilities like a swimming pool, restaurant, bar, and laundry facilities.
  • Jabiru Caravan Park: Jabiru Caravan Park is located in the town of Jabiru and has powered and unpowered sites for RVs and caravans. It is a short drive from several attractions in Kakadu National Park, including Ubirr and Cahills Crossing.
  • Merl Campground: Merl Campground is located in the southern part of Kakadu National Park and has powered and unpowered sites for RVs and caravans. It is located near several attractions, including Maguk, Gunlom, and Jim Jim Falls.
  • Muirella Park: Muirella Park is a private campground located on the outskirts of Kakadu National Park. It has powered and unpowered sites for RVs and caravans and offers facilities like a swimming pool, camp kitchen, and laundry facilities.
  • Garnamarr Campground: Garnamarr Campground is located in the southern part of Kakadu National Park and offers unpowered sites for RVs and caravans. It is located near the famous Jim Jim Falls and Twin Falls and is a popular camping spot during the dry season.
Ubirr Sunset Lookout


What are the best photo opportunities in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park offers endless photo opportunities for both professional and amateur photographers. Some of the top locations for capturing stunning photos in the park include:

  • Ubirr: This sandstone outcrop offers panoramic views of the surrounding floodplains and is a popular spot to capture stunning sunsets and rock art.
  • Nourlangie Rock: A sacred site to the Indigenous people, Nourlangie Rock offers a range of photo opportunities, including ancient rock art, stunning views of the surrounding landscape, and wildlife.
  • Gunlom Falls: The infinity pool at the top of the falls provides a perfect spot to capture stunning landscape shots and enjoy a refreshing swim.
  • Jim Jim Falls: The sheer drop of the falls surrounded by towering cliffs offers a perfect photo opportunity for those with a sense of adventure.
  • Yellow Water: The wetlands of Yellow Water are home to a diverse range of wildlife, including crocodiles, birds, and buffalo, making it a great spot for capturing wildlife shots.
  • Maguk Gorge: The crystal-clear waters of Maguk Gorge surrounded by lush vegetation provide a great spot for capturing some beautiful landscape photos.
  • Mamukala Wetlands: Another wetland area that offers photo opportunities of various bird species, such as egrets, herons, and ibises.
  • Nawurlandja Lookout: This lookout provides a panoramic view of the Nourlangie rock formations and the Arnhem Land escarpment in the distance.
  • Bardedjilidji Walk: This 12 km walk takes you through stunning landscapes and offers several opportunities for wildlife and landscape photography.
  • Twin Falls: Twin Falls is another waterfall and plunge pool combination that offers fantastic opportunities for scenic and action photography.
  • Anbangbang Billabong: The tranquil waters of Anbangbang Billabong reflect the surrounding trees and rocks, making it a great place for landscape photography.
Nawurlandja lookout walk

Are there any restrictions on photography in Kakadu National Park?

There are some restrictions on photography in certain areas of Kakadu National Park due to cultural, safety, and environmental reasons. For example, some areas may be considered sacred and photography is not allowed.

In other areas, flash photography may be prohibited to protect nocturnal wildlife. It’s always a good idea to check with park rangers or cultural guides to understand any restrictions on photography before taking photos.

Additionally, it’s important to always be respectful and sensitive to the cultural and environmental significance of the places being photographed.

What are the traditional owners of Kakadu National Park?

The traditional owners of Kakadu National Park are the Bininj/Mungguy people, who have lived in the area for tens of thousands of years.

They have a deep spiritual and cultural connection to the land and its natural resources and are the custodians of many of the park’s important sites and features. The Bininj/Mungguy people continue to play an important role in the management and protection of the park, working closely with the Australian government and park authorities to preserve the park’s unique cultural and environmental values.

Are there any Aboriginal communities in or near Kakadu National Park?

Yes, there are several Aboriginal communities in and around Kakadu National Park. Many of these communities have lived in the area for thousands of years and have a deep connection to the land and its natural resources.

Some of the communities include Gunbalanya (Oenpelli), Jabiru, Maningrida, and Warruwi. These communities have unique cultures and traditions and offer visitors the opportunity to learn about their way of life and experience their arts, crafts, and music.

Many of the communities also offer cultural tours and activities, such as bush tucker walks and traditional hunting and fishing experiences. It is important to respect their culture and land and to obtain permission before entering their communities or participating in their activities.

Muirella Campground - Kakadu at Night

Cultural tours and activities available in Kakadu National Park:

  • Yellow Water Billabong Cruise: This award-winning cruise takes visitors on a journey through the wetlands of Kakadu, providing an opportunity to see a variety of wildlife and learn about the cultural significance of the area.
  • Warradjan Aboriginal Cultural Centre: This museum showcases the traditions and culture of the Bininj/Mungguy people of Kakadu, featuring exhibits of art, artifacts, and multimedia displays.
  • Cultural Tours with Traditional Owners: Several tour operators offer guided tours led by Indigenous people, providing an opportunity to learn about the traditional practices, stories, and history of the local communities.
  • Didgeridoo and Cultural Demonstrations: Visitors can watch or participate in demonstrations of traditional art and music, including didgeridoo playing and painting.
  • Bush Tucker Walks: These guided walks take visitors through the bush to learn about the different plants and animals that have sustained Indigenous communities for thousands of years.
  • Rock Art Tours: Guided tours of ancient rock art sites provide an opportunity to learn about the history and cultural significance of the artwork, as well as the methods and materials used to create it.
  • Kakadu 4WD Tours: Visitors can take a 4WD tour to explore the rugged and remote areas of the park, learning about the culture, flora, and fauna along the way.
Jim Jim Falls from Viewing Pool Lookout

Are there any Natural Wonders in Kakadu National Park?

Below list of natural wonders is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the incredible landscapes and geological features that can be found in Kakadu National Park. We choose them because each site offers a unique experience that will leave visitors in awe of the natural beauty of this unique part of Australia.

  • Jim Jim Falls – A towering 200-meter waterfall surrounded by sheer cliffs and rock formations.
  • Twin Falls – A stunning set of falls that cascade into a crystal-clear pool, accessible only by boat or a challenging hike.
  • Maguk Gorge – A picturesque gorge with a crystal-clear pool, surrounded by towering rock walls and a waterfall at one end.
  • Gunlom Falls – A series of cascading waterfalls and pools, offering stunning views of the surrounding landscape from the top.
  • Ubirr Rock – A stunning lookout point that offers panoramic views of the surrounding wetlands and rock formations.
  • Nourlangie Rock – A rock formation with ancient rock art that showcases the cultural history of the Indigenous people of the area.
  • Yellow Water Billabong – A scenic wetland that is home to a variety of bird and animal species, including crocodiles, and is best explored via a guided boat tour.
  • Cahills Crossing – A tidal crossing point that is a popular spot for fishing and crocodile sightings.
  • Mary River Wetlands – A vast wetland area that is home to a variety of bird and animal species, including saltwater crocodiles.
  • Yurmikmik Walks – A set of hiking trails that take visitors through diverse landscapes, including stunning waterfalls, rock formations, and wetlands.

Are there any special events or festivals that take place in Kakadu National Park?

There are a few special events and festivals that take place in Kakadu National Park throughout the year:

  • Mahbilil Festival: This annual festival takes place in Jabiru in September and celebrates the traditional culture of the Bininj/Mungguy people. The festival features music, dance, and cultural activities, and is a great opportunity to experience the living culture of the region.
  • Kakadu Bird Week: Held in October, this week-long event is a celebration of the incredible birdlife of Kakadu National Park. Visitors can participate in bird-watching tours, workshops, and talks led by local experts.
  • Kakadu Triathlon: This annual event takes place in May and features a 2.5 km swim, a 40 km cycle, and a 10 km run. The course takes participants through some of the most beautiful scenery in the park, including the stunning Magela Creek.
  • Yellow Water Billabong Feast: This special event takes place in November and celebrates the local food and culture of the region. Visitors can sample traditional dishes and learn about the history and significance of local ingredients.

What is the Barramundi Dreaming Festival in Kakadu National Park?

The Barramundi Dreaming Festival is an annual celebration of the rich Indigenous culture of the Kakadu region. The festival is held in late May or early June and features traditional dance and music performances, art exhibitions, and workshops.

The festival is named after the iconic Barramundi fish, which has great cultural and spiritual significance for the traditional owners of the land. Visitors to the festival can experience a range of activities, including guided walks and talks, boat tours, and cultural demonstrations.

The festival provides a unique opportunity to learn about and engage with the traditional culture of the Kakadu region.

Aboriginal Performance at Cooktown Discovery Festival

What is the Mahbilil Festival in Kakadu National Park?

The Mahbilil Festival is an annual event that celebrates Indigenous culture in Kakadu National Park. The festival takes place in Jabiru, the largest town in the park, and features a range of cultural activities, including music and dance performances, art displays, traditional food tastings, and workshops.

The festival is named after the Mahbilil bird, which is significant in local Indigenous culture. The event aims to promote understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture and heritage, and to showcase the talent and creativity of local artists and performers. The festival typically takes place in late August or early September each year.

What is the best way to experience the cultural heritage of Kakadu National Park?

The best way to experience the cultural heritage of Kakadu National Park is to take part in an Aboriginal cultural tour.

There are several tour operators in the park who offer guided tours that provide insight into the local Aboriginal culture, traditions, and history. These tours typically include visits to rock art sites, traditional bush tucker experiences, and stories passed down through generations.

Visitors can also participate in workshops where they can learn about traditional craft makings, such as weaving, painting, and spear making. The cultural experiences offered in the park provide a unique opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the land and the people who have lived on it for thousands of years.

There are also several places in and around Kakadu National Park where you can buy Aboriginal art:

  • Warradjan Cultural Centre: The Warradjan Cultural Centre is located in the heart of Kakadu National Park, near Cooinda. The centre has a gift shop that sells a range of Aboriginal arts and crafts, including paintings, carvings, and textiles.
  • Injalak Arts: Injalak Arts is an Aboriginal-owned and operated art centre located in the nearby town of Gunbalanya. The centre sells a range of high-quality traditional and contemporary art, including paintings, carvings, and textiles.
  • Marrawuddi Gallery: Marrawuddi Gallery is a social enterprise that supports local Indigenous artists and provides an outlet for their work. The gallery is located in Jabiru and sells a range of art and crafts, including paintings, textiles, and pottery.
  • Bowali Visitor Centre: The Bowali Visitor Centre is located in Jabiru and has a gift shop that sells a range of Aboriginal art and souvenirs.
  • Markets and pop-up stalls: During the tourist season (May to October), there are often markets and pop-up stalls in and around Kakadu National Park that sell Aboriginal art and crafts. Keep an eye out for signs and flyers advertising these events.

What is the geology of Kakadu National Park?

Nanguluwurr Art Site Walk

Kakadu National Park is located in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province, a region known for its unique geology and mineral deposits.

The park itself contains a range of geological formations, including ancient sandstone plateaus, escarpments, floodplains, and wetlands.

The sandstone plateaus are particularly notable for their age, with some formations dating back over 1.8 billion years. These formations have been eroded over time by wind and water, creating spectacular gorges, waterfalls, and other natural features.

The region is also home to extensive deposits of uranium, which have been mined in the area since the 1950s. The park’s geology has played a significant role in shaping its landscape and natural features and continues to be an important part of the region’s cultural heritage.

How can I learn more about rock art in Kakadu National Park?

To learn more about the rock art in Kakadu National Park, visitors can participate in guided tours and cultural experiences offered by park rangers and traditional owners.

Guided tours to rock art sites are available from various locations throughout the park, and visitors can also attend cultural festivals and events to learn about the history and significance of rock art.

The Warradjan Cultural Centre is also a good place to learn about rock art in Kakadu National Park. The centre features informative displays on the park’s rich Aboriginal cultural heritage, including exhibits on rock art and its significance to the local Aboriginal communities.

Additionally, visitors can purchase books and other resources from the visitor centres or online to learn more about the rock art in Kakadu National Park. These books can provide more detailed information on the history and significance of rock art, as well as how it has been interpreted and studied by archaeologists and anthropologists.

Ubirr - Aboriginal Paintings

Rock art and indigenous history are of significant importance in Kakadu National Park as they provide a window into the rich cultural and spiritual heritage of the Indigenous people of the area.

The park contains one of the largest and most important collections of rock art in the world, with thousands of ancient paintings and carvings scattered throughout the landscape. The rock art dates back thousands of years and provides insights into the daily life, beliefs, and cultural practices of the Indigenous people who have inhabited the area for tens of thousands of years.

In addition to rock art, the park is home to numerous sites of cultural significance, including burial grounds, ceremonial sites, and campsites. These sites offer important insights into the spiritual and cultural practices of the Indigenous people of the area and provide a tangible link to the past.

The Indigenous people of the area, known as the Bininj/Mungguy, have lived in the Kakadu region for tens of thousands of years and have a deep connection to the land and its natural resources. They have a unique and intimate understanding of the natural world and have developed sophisticated systems of land management and resource use that have sustained them for generations.

In recognition of the cultural significance of the area, the Australian government, in partnership with the traditional owners, established the Kakadu National Park in 1979, with the primary aim of protecting the natural and cultural values of the area.

Today, the park is jointly managed by the traditional owners and the government and offers visitors the opportunity to learn about and experience the rich cultural and spiritual heritage of the Indigenous people of the area.

Arnhem Land - Open Gallery

Top rock art sites to visit in the Kakadu NP that can’t be missed

  • Ubirr: Ubirr is one of the most famous rock art sites in Kakadu National Park, featuring a wide range of artwork depicting everything from animals and plants to humans and spirits. The site is also known for its stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
  • Nourlangie Rock: Nourlangie Rock is another important rock art site in Kakadu National Park, featuring a diverse range of artwork, including some of the oldest known examples of X-ray art in the region. The site is also known for its stunning views of the surrounding countryside.
  • Burrungkuy (Nourlangie): Burrungkuy is a site within the Nourlangie Rock area, featuring a range of rock art styles and motifs, including some of the most well-preserved examples of dynamic figures and X-ray art in the region.
  • Anbangbang Gallery: Anbangbang Gallery is another important rock art site in the Nourlangie Rock area, featuring a range of artwork depicting animals, humans, and spirits. The site is known for its intricate cross-hatching and delicate lines.
  • Nanguluwur: Nanguluwur is a site in the southern part of Kakadu National Park, featuring a range of rock art styles and motifs, including some of the best-preserved examples of Bradshaw art in the region. The site is also known for its stunning views of the surrounding landscape.

Park ranger or an Indigenous guide, can provide further insights into the cultural and spiritual significance of the artwork and the surrounding landscape.

Are there any other activities available in Kakadu National Park?

Yes, there is a range of ranger-guided activities available in Kakadu National Park. These activities are designed to help visitors experience and learn about the park’s natural and cultural features. Some of the ranger-guided activities include:

  • Guided walks: These are led by park rangers and cover a range of topics, from the park’s cultural history to its unique flora and fauna.
  • Campfire stories: These are held in the evening around a campfire and provide an opportunity to learn more about the park’s cultural heritage and stories.
  • Cultural demonstrations: These may include traditional dance performances, basket weaving, and painting demonstrations.
  • Wildlife talks: These are led by park rangers and provide information on the park’s unique wildlife, including crocodiles, birds, and other animals.
  • Boat tours: Ranger-guided boat tours are available on Yellow Water Billabong, where visitors can learn about the wetlands and the wildlife that call it home.
Comb Crested Jacana


What are the best birdwatching spots in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park is a birdwatcher’s paradise, with over 280 species of birds found within the park. Some of the best birdwatching spots in Kakadu National Park include:

  • Mamukala Wetlands: Located in the southern part of the park, this wetland is a popular spot for waterbirds, including egrets, herons, magpie geese, and ducks.
  • Yellow Water: This wetland is home to a diverse range of bird species, including jabirus, whistling ducks, and sea eagles. The best time to visit Yellow Water is at sunrise or sunset.
  • Ubirr Rock: In addition to its stunning rock art, Ubirr is a great spot to see a range of bird species, including bowerbirds, parrots, and cockatoos.
  • Bardedjilidji Sandstone Walk: This short walk takes you through a sandstone country that is home to a variety of bird species, including honeyeaters and finches.
  • Nourlangie Rock: This rock shelter is home to several species of birds, including kookaburras, lorikeets, and kingfishers.
  • Anbangbang Billabong: This billabong is home to a range of waterbirds, including egrets, herons, and magpie geese.
  • Nawurlandja Lookout: This lookout offers stunning views of the park and is a great spot to see birds of prey, including eagles and kites.
Brolgas and birds at Town Common Conservation Park

Brolgas and Black Stork can be spotted in various locations throughout Kakadu National Park.

Brolgas are often seen in the wetlands, particularly at Mamukala Wetlands, Yellow Water Billabong, and Alligator Billabong. They can also be seen in the grassy plains and floodplains of the park.

Black Stork (Jabiru) can be found in similar wetland areas, such as Yellow Water Billabong, as well as in the Magela Creek and East Alligator River regions. They are also known to frequent the rock escarpments and gorges of the park.

Yellow Waters Morning Cruise

Can I visit the Jim Jim Falls and Twin Falls all year round?

Unfortunately no. Jim Jim Falls and Twin Falls are located in a remote area of Kakadu National Park and are only accessible during the dry season, which typically runs from May to October.

During the wet season, which runs from November to April, the access road to these falls is often closed due to flooding and the risk of crocodile attacks is also higher. It’s important to check the latest information and access conditions with the park authorities before planning a visit.

Yellow Waters Sunset Cruise


What is the Yellow Water Billabong cruise and why is it popular?

The Yellow Water Billabong cruise is a popular activity in Kakadu National Park. It is a boat tour that takes visitors through the South Alligator River floodplain and the Yellow Water Billabong, which is known for its diverse wildlife and stunning scenery.

During the cruise, people can see a variety of wildlife, including crocodiles, buffalo, wild horses, and an array of bird species, such as jabirus, egrets, and sea eagles. The knowledgeable guides on the boat also provide commentary on the ecosystem and cultural significance of the area, including the importance of the wetlands to the local Aboriginal people.

The Yellow Water Billabong cruise is popular because it provides visitors with a unique opportunity to see and learn about the flora and fauna of Kakadu National Park. It’s also a comfortable and relaxing way to experience the park’s wetlands and take in the natural beauty of the region.

Yellow Waters Morning Cruise


What are the best places to see the sunrise and sunset in Kakadu National Park?

There are many beautiful places to see the sunrise and sunset in Kakadu National Park. Here are some popular spots:

  • Ubirr: Ubirr is one of the most popular spots for watching the sunset in Kakadu. It is located in the East Alligator region and offers panoramic views of the surrounding wetlands and sandstone formations.
  • Nawurlandja Lookout: This lookout is located in the Nourlangie region and offers stunning views of the surrounding landscape. It is a popular spot for watching the sunrise.
  • Yellow Water Billabong: This is my favourite spot to see the sunrise. The reflections on the water can be particularly beautiful during sunrise and sunset.
  • Gunlom: Gunlom is located in the southern part of the park and offers stunning views of the surrounding countryside. It is a popular spot for swimming, as well as for watching the sunrise and sunset.
  • Maguk (Barramundi Gorge): Maguk is a popular swimming spot, and it also offers stunning views of the surrounding landscape. It is a great spot for watching the sunset, as the colours of the sky reflect off the water.
Yellow Waters Sunset Cruise

What are the top river and billabong cruises in Kakadu National Park?

There are several top river and billabong cruises in Kakadu, each offering a different experience. The Yellow Water Cruise is perhaps the most popular, and for good reason. This two-hour cruise takes visitors along the South Alligator River, where they can spot a wide variety of birdlife, as well as crocodiles, turtles, and other animals that inhabit the riverbanks and surrounding wetlands.

Another popular cruise is the East Alligator River Cruise, which takes visitors into Arnhem Land and provides a rare opportunity to learn about the customs and culture of the local Aboriginal people. Along the way, visitors can spot a range of wildlife, including crocodiles, fish, and bird species such as eagles, jabirus, and kingfishers.

Other notable river and billabong cruises in Kakadu include the Corroboree Billabong Cruise, where visitors can see an abundance of birdlife, including the rare and endangered Gouldian Finch. And the Mamukala Wetlands Cruise, which takes visitors to the bird-watching mecca of Mamukala Wetlands, where thousands of magpie geese and other waterbirds gather during the dry season.

What is the Gunlom Plunge Pool and why is it famous?

Gunlom Plunge Pool is a natural infinity pool located in the southern part of Kakadu National Park, in the Northern Territory of Australia. It is a popular attraction for visitors to the park, known for its crystal-clear waters and stunning views of the surrounding landscape.

The pool is fed by a waterfall that flows down from the top of a cliff face, which visitors can climb to get a bird’s-eye view of the pool and the surrounding area. The area is also known for its sandy beach and picnic areas, making it a great spot for a day trip or a longer stay.

The walk to the Gunlom Plunge Pools involves a steep climb up a rocky staircase that has around 300 steps, which can take approximately 20 to 30 minutes depending on your fitness level.

Since 2019 the walk to the top of Gunlom is closed at the request of traditional owners. You can check the current status on the Park Australia website for Gunlom.

Gunlom Falls

What are the best waterfalls to visit in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park is home to many beautiful waterfalls, and some of the best ones to visit include:

  • Jim Jim Falls: These falls are a popular attraction in Kakadu and are known for their spectacular 200-meter-high cliffs that surround the plunge pool.
  • Twin Falls: These falls are located near Jim Jim Falls and can be accessed by a 4WD track or a boat ride up the gorge.
  • Maguk: This waterfall is also known as Barramundi Gorge and is a great spot for swimming and picnicking.
  • Gunlom Plunge Pool: This is another popular swimming spot in Kakadu and is known for its crystal-clear waters and stunning views.
  • Motor Car Falls: This secluded waterfall is located in the southern part of Kakadu and can be accessed via a 4WD track.
  • Boulder Creek Falls: This waterfall is located in the heart of Kakadu and is a great spot for birdwatching and bushwalking.
  • Koolpin Gorge: This is a remote gorge located in the southern part of Kakadu and is known for its pristine waters and rugged beauty.

The wet season, which runs from October to April, can be an exciting time to visit the waterfalls in Kakadu National Park. During this time, the waterfalls are typically flowing more powerfully.

Koolpin Gorge - Pink Pool

Is it possible to swim in the waterfalls and pools in Kakadu National Park?

Yes, it is possible to swim in the waterfalls and pools in Kakadu National Park. However, it’s important to note that some areas may be closed off to swimming due to crocodile activity or other safety concerns. It’s important to follow all signs and warnings in the park and to only swim in designated areas where it’s safe to do so.

Some of the waterfalls and pools where swimming is allowed include:
  • Gunlom Plunge Pool: A popular swimming spot located at the top of a waterfall. It is accessible via a steep climb, but the views and refreshing waters make it worth the effort.
  • Maguk (Barramundi Gorge): A picturesque waterfall and natural pool that is popular for swimming and snorkelling. It is surrounded by lush greenery and towering cliffs.
  • Motor Car Falls: A secluded waterfall that is accessible via a short walk through the bush. The pool at the base of the waterfall is a great spot for swimming and relaxing.
  • Boulder Creek: This series of walks includes several waterfalls and swimming spots

Can I go on a fishing trip to Kakadu National Park?

Yes, fishing is allowed in certain areas of Kakadu National Park. The park is home to a variety of fish species, including barramundi, catfish, and saratoga. Fishing permits are required and can be obtained from the Bowali Visitor Centre, as well as from some of the ranger stations in the park.

It’s important to note that fishing in Kakadu is strictly catch and release, and there are restrictions on the types of lures and hooks that can be used. Additionally, some areas of the park are off-limits to fishing due to their cultural significance or for conservation reasons. Please check with the park authorities for the most up-to-date information on fishing in the park.

Adelaide River Saltwater Crocodile

What are the top wildlife experiences in Kakadu National Park?

My top pick of wildlife experiences in Kakadu National Park is the Yellow Water Billabong cruise, where you can see a variety of wildlife including saltwater crocodiles, wild horses, and a wide range of bird species. But there is many more like:

Mamukala Wetlands: The Mamukala Wetlands are a great place to see a wide variety of waterbirds, including magpie geese, egrets, and brolgas. The wetlands are located in the heart of Kakadu National Park, near the town of Jabiru.

Cahills Crossing: Cahills Crossing is a popular spot for fishing and wildlife viewing, as it’s one of the best places to see saltwater crocodiles in the park. The crossing is located on the East Alligator River, near the town of Jabiru.

Bardedjilidji Walk: The Bardedjilidji Walk is a popular walking trail in the southern part of the park, near the town of Cooinda. The trail takes visitors through a variety of habitats, including monsoon forests and floodplains, and offers a chance to see a wide variety of wildlife, including wallabies, kangaroos, and birdlife.

Bird Watching at Ubirr: The Ubirr rock art site is also a great spot for bird watching, as the site is located near a large wetland area that attracts a variety of bird species. Visitors to the site can often spot magpie geese, whistling ducks, and other waterbirds.

Mary River Roadhouse: The Mary River Roadhouse is located just outside of Kakadu National Park, and offers visitors a chance to see a variety of wildlife, including wallabies, kangaroos, and waterbirds. The roadhouse also offers crocodile feeding tours for visitors who want to get up close and personal with these fearsome creatures.

Kakadu National Park is home to a diverse array of wildlife, including several species that are unique to the region, such as the black wallaroo (it has distinctive black fur and is much smaller than the more common Red Kangaroo) and the White-throated Grasswren.

Bardedjilidji Walk​


What are the best walking trails for families with young children in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park offers a number of walking trails suitable for families with young children. For example:

  • Bardedjilidji Walk (1.5 km return): This short walk is located near the Bowali Visitor Centre and takes you through woodland and past rock art sites.
  • Nawurlandja Lookout Walk (1.5 km return): This walk provides a stunning view of the surrounding landscape and is located near the Nourlangie rock art site.
  • Yurmikmik Walks (various distances): The Yurmikmik walks offer a range of options for families with young children, including the Motor Car Falls Walk (2 km return), Boulder Creek Walk (2.5 km return), and Kurrundie Falls Walk (1 km return).
  • Gubara Pools and Motor Car Falls Walk (2.5 km return): This walk takes you to a beautiful swimming hole and waterfall, and is suitable for families with young children.

List the top hiking trails and walks in Kakadu National Park

Each of the below hiking trails and walks offers a unique experience that showcases the natural beauty and cultural significance of Kakadu National Park.

You can explore the stunning landscapes, observe the unique wildlife, and learn about the cultural history of the area while getting some exercise and fresh air. It’s important to note that some of these trails may be closed at certain times of the year, and visitors should always be prepared with appropriate gear and supplies, including plenty of water and sun protection.

  • Barrk Sandstone Walk – This 12 km trail takes visitors through scenic woodlands and sandstone outcrops, offering stunning views of the surrounding landscape. The trail is moderately difficult, with some steep sections, and takes about 4-5 hours to complete.
  • Yurmikmik Walks – This series of trails take visitors through diverse landscapes, including stunning waterfalls, rock formations, and wetlands. The walks range in length from 1 km to 12 km and vary in difficulty level. The trails offer the chance to observe unique wildlife and learn about the cultural history of the area.
  • Nanguluwurr Art Site Walk – This short 3 km walk takes tourists to an ancient rock art site that showcases the cultural history of the Indigenous people of the area. The walk is easy, with some stairs, and takes about 1-2 hours to complete.
  • Jim Jim Falls Walk – This 1 km trail takes visitors to the base of the iconic Jim Jim Falls, where they can take a refreshing swim in the crystal-clear pool. The trail is moderately difficult, with some rock scrambling, and takes about 1-2 hours to complete.
  • Twin Falls Gorge Walk – This 4 km trail takes people to the stunning Twin Falls, which cascades into a crystal-clear pool that is accessible only by boat or a challenging hike. The trail is difficult, with some steep sections and rock scrambling, and takes about 3-4 hours to complete.
  • Bukbukluk Lookout Walk – This short 1 km walk takes visitors to a scenic lookout point that offers stunning views of the surrounding wetlands and rock formations. The walk is easy and takes about 30 minutes to complete.
  • Motor Car Falls Walk – This 6 km trail takes visitors to a secluded waterfall and swimming hole that is accessible only by foot. The trail is moderately difficult, with some steep sections and rock scrambling, and takes about 2-3 hours to complete.
  • Koolpin Gorge Walk – This challenging 12 km trail takes visitors through remote wilderness to a secluded swimming hole and stunning waterfall. The trail is difficult, with some steep sections and rock scrambling, and takes about 6-7 hours to complete.
Koolpin Creek from the hill

What are the Overnight walks in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park offers several overnight hikes for visitors who want to immerse themselves in the park’s rugged wilderness. Some of the popular overnight walks in Kakadu National Park are:

  • Barramundi Gorge Walk: The Barramundi Gorge Walk is a moderate overnight walk that takes visitors through savannah woodland, creek beds, and rocky escarpments to reach the beautiful Barramundi Gorge. The walk offers opportunities to spot wildlife and admire the stunning landscapes.
  • Koolpin Gorge – Mentioned above. It’s a challenging walk, but visitors are rewarded with a truly unique wilderness experience.
  • Jim Jim Falls and Twin Falls Walk: The Jim Jim Falls and Twin Falls Walk is a challenging overnight walk that takes visitors through rugged terrain to reach two of Kakadu’s most iconic waterfalls. The walk offers stunning views of the surrounding escarpments and waterfalls.
  • Jatbula Trail – While not technically in Kakadu National Park, the Jatbula Trail is a popular multi-day walk that takes visitors through the stunning Nitmiluk National Park. The 62-kilometre trail includes views of waterfalls, swimming holes, and stunning rock formations. It’s a challenging walk, but the views and the opportunity to swim in the park’s pristine waterholes make it a must-do for adventurous visitors.

What are the best spots for star watching in Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park offers some excellent opportunities for star watching due to its remote location and lack of light pollution. You will not be surprised if I point again to the same known locations like:

  • Jim Jim Falls and Twin Falls: These waterfalls are located in a remote part of the park, far from any artificial light sources, making them an ideal location for stargazing.
  • Anbangbang Billabong: This billabong is located near the town of Jabiru and offers a beautiful location to watch the stars.
  • Ubirr: This popular lookout provides stunning views over the park during the day, but it is also a great spot for stargazing at night.
  • Yellow Water Billabong: The calm waters of Yellow Water Billabong reflect the stars at night, creating a stunning backdrop for stargazing.
  • Cooinda Lodge: This lodge provides accommodation and guided tours of the park, and it also offers stargazing tours for visitors.

The best time for star watching is during the dry season, from April to September, when the skies are clear and the humidity is low.

Bramwell at night


Can I take a scenic flight over to Kakadu National Park?

Of course! This is a great way to see the park from a unique perspective and get a better understanding of its vastness and diverse landscapes. Several tour operators offer scenic flights over Kakadu National Park, and some also offer packages that include other activities, such as guided tours and cultural experiences.

Below are a few companies that offer scenic flights over Kakadu National Park:

  • Kakadu Air Services
  • Airborne Solutions
  • Arafura Aviation
  • Katherine Aviation
  • Nautilus Aviation
  • Air Kakadu
  • The Scenic Flight Company
  • Gagudju Dreaming
  • Hardy Aviation

It’s best to check with each company for specific details on their scenic flight offerings and prices.

What are the best day trips from Kakadu National Park?

Kakadu National Park is surrounded by many unique and beautiful destinations that are well worth exploring on a day trip. Here are some of the best day trips from Kakadu National Park:

  • Litchfield National Park: Located about a 2-hour drive from Kakadu, Litchfield National Park is known for its stunning waterfalls, swimming holes, and monsoon rainforest. Some of the highlights include Florence Falls, Wangi Falls, and the magnetic termite mounds.
  • Nitmiluk National Park: Nitmiluk National Park is a little further from Kakadu (about a 3-hour drive), but it’s worth it for the stunning views of the Katherine Gorge. Visitors can take a boat tour, hike, or even go canoeing through the gorge.
  • Darwin: Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory and is only a few hour’s drive from Kakadu. In Darwin, visitors can explore the city’s cultural and historical attractions, such as the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, or take a sunset cruise on Darwin Harbour.
  • Mary River Wetlands: The Mary River Wetlands are a wildlife lover’s paradise, with opportunities to spot crocodiles, buffalo, and a wide range of bird species. The wetlands are only a short drive from Kakadu and are best explored on a guided tour.
  • Arnhem Land: Arnhem Land is a vast wilderness area that covers more than 97,000 square kilometres. It’s a unique and remote part of Australia that is only accessible with a permit, but visitors can explore its stunning coastline, and ancient rock art sites, and learn about its rich cultural heritage on a guided tour.
Arnhem Land

Why should you come to Kakadu National Park?

Because Kakadu National Park is a natural wonderland with an abundance of wildlife, stunning landscapes, and significant cultural sites.

The park is worth visiting to experience the unique blend of Aboriginal culture and natural beauty that it has to offer. The ultimate bucket list for visitors includes natural wonders such as the Jim Jim Falls, hiking trails like the Barrk Sandstone Walk, wildlife experiences such as Yellow Water Cruises, and cultural sites like the Nourlangie Rock Art.

There are also family-friendly activities, scenic views, and overnight walks that offer a complete and unforgettable experience. With this diverse range of attractions, Kakadu National Park is an ideal destination for anyone looking to explore the natural and cultural wonders of Australia.

I hope that our best of Kakadu National Park list encouraged you to come here at least once in your lifetime.


From red dirt to tropical rainforest. Ten places anyone should add to their bucket list. Subscribe and receive ten colourful infographics.

Please subscribe to receive our monthly newsletter


Enjoy outdoors with Tentworld equipment


Did you like our content?

Buy Me A Coffee

4WD Equipment Checklist

GPS Navigator or compass

Maxtrax – if you get bogged, you can use it for additional traction

Tire Deflator – deflate tires quickly when going on dirt or 4WD

Air Compressor – inflate tires quickly after going back on bitumen (we use MM)

Tire Repair Kit – to fix the tire by yourself when you don’t have access to the tire shop (we use Oztrail)

UHF Radio – for communication with your mates and in emergency

Full Recovery Kit (with Dampener Blanket) – must-have if you are going on real off-road

High Lift Jack – useful if you do serious 4WD tracks

Shovel – useful if you get bogged, also good for campfire cooking

Fuel funnel with water filter – additional protection when fueling up in dodgy places

Additional fuel canisters


Read more from our guides

Learn how to start a travel blog like this (step by step guide)

Learn more about off-road driving from our guide

Learn 11 Tips about outback camping from our guide

Learn about bush cooking from our ultimate guide

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *